• What Your Court Reporter Wishes You Knew

    Court reporters are an essential part of getting your job done as an attorney, whether you’re using transcripts they prepared in court to get ready for an appeal or hiring them for deposition services in San Jose . Since court reporters perform such an important function, it makes sense that you would want to give them all the support they need to get the job done. Here are some of the things your court reporter wishes you knew—keep them in mind for your next deposition. court - reporter

    Court reporters rely on attorneys to manage the conversation.

    It’s extremely difficult for your court reporter to accurately transcribe everything being said when people are shouting over each other, mumbling, or speaking too fast. Your court reporter will be reluctant to interject, so he or she will rely on you to ensure that there is an orderly flow to the questioning and that witnesses speak up and speak clearly. If necessary, your court reporter will ask for an adjustment, but you can help him or her focus on the transcript by managing the conversation yourself.

    Court reporters can’t discuss your client’s case.

    Attorneys frequently ask court reporters to offer an opinion about their client’s case. They ask the court reporter to weigh in on how witnesses were acting or if he or she thinks that the case has merit. Although court reporters are privy to many different cases, they are strictly impartial and focus exclusively on creating an accurate transcript. In order to remain professional, court reporters will not comment on your case or their opinion of the deposition.

    Court reporters need breaks.

    Depositions frequently take many hours, and attorneys will often order lunch for the participants so that there is no need to take a break. Because court reporters can record the proceedings and eat at the same time, working through lunch means they don’t get a break. Schedule breaks in your deposition for your court reporter to eat, use the restroom, and relax for a few minutes, so he or she can return refreshed and ready to focus.

  • Read Tips for Communicating with ESL Clients

    When you’re working with ESL clients on depositions or other legal proceedings, you are bound by the Bar to communicate with them about their case as you would any other client. Achieving this goal can sometimes be challenging, however. To ensure your communication with your ESL client is adequate, in addition to the usual court reporters and other support services you work with on cases, you may also need to use interpreting services in San Jose for help. Use these tips to help you build better communication with your ESL clients. esl - deposition

    Recognize the Degrees of Understanding

    For many people, talking to an attorney and listening to legalese even in their own language is challenging. For ESL clients, the language you use as an attorney can be very unclear. Your clients may technically understand your words, but they may not grasp the full meaning of what you are saying. Don’t take your client’s word that they understand what you’ve said without ensuring that he or she doesn’t just understand the words but the implications as well. Consider simplifying your language and using lay terms to get your points across.

    Provide Translations of Written Documents

    There are many tools available for translating written documents, so consider using some of them to translate documents for your clients. Provide a copy of the document in English and then provide a translation. Doing so will help you ensure that your clients truly understand what the document addresses.

    Hire an Interpreter

    Don’t take a chance with your clients’ understanding of important issues in their cases. When you’re reviewing cases with ESL clients or preparing them for trials or depositions, hire an interpreter to ensure your communication is easy and effective. You can also use an interpreter during deposition or to help during trial testimony. Using an interpreter will help your ESL clients avoid confusion, even when being questioned by other attorneys.

  • Presentation Tips for New Lawyers

    Presentations are part of life for lawyers, but they’re not quite like other things you do all day, like depositions or examining witnesses in court. The things you do to ensure you succeed in those tasks may not help you deliver a great presentation. Just as you need to prepare for depositions in San Jose differently than you do for trial work, you need to use the right technique to get ready for your presentation.

    Watch this video for tips for lawyers for making excellent presentations. One of the biggest mistakes lawyers make is going into presentations with a script. After all, law school stresses the importance of impeccable preparation, but with a presentation, scripting your remarks makes you sound stiff and nervous. Instead, use your personality during a presentation to engage with your audience and get the kind of interaction you want.

  • Top Reasons to Rely on Our Transcription Services

    When you need transcription services in San Jose , make Talty Court Reporters, Inc. the company you trust. Attorneys in the area have chosen us to handle everything from deposition services to court reporting since 1964.

    We understand that there is no compromising when it comes to accuracy in legal transcripts. That is why all our staff is trained in and compliant with guidelines from the State CSR Board. We are adept at working with multiple formatting options, including paperless transcripts, YesLaw, and E-Transcript. Our transcriptionists provide every client with a free, condensed version of their transcript for fast reference and a CD that also includes any exhibits that have been scanned. When your case is urgent, we can provide expedited services and rough drafts of the transcript as requested. Our years of experience and highly trained professionals mean that you can hire us with confidence instead of taking chances with an independent contractor.

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