• Speaking at Your Next Board Meeting

    When you address your company’s board, there can be a tremendous amount of pressure to deliver complex information clearly and concisely. Although your board may use transcription services or hire a court reporter in San Jose to create a record for later reference, it is important for the board members to leave your presentation feeling like they understand your topic. This video will help you get the job done.

    When addressing the board, avoid delving into the technical ins and outs of your topic and instead present using top-level information. The board will lead you into the intricacies of your topic that they wish to discuss through questions. If you use slides, make sure the board and your court reporter has them in advance. Compare notes with other presenters in advance, so you can ensure you are delivering a cohesive message without repeating information.

  • Read Tips for Communicating with ESL Clients

    When you’re working with ESL clients on depositions or other legal proceedings, you are bound by the Bar to communicate with them about their case as you would any other client. Achieving this goal can sometimes be challenging, however. To ensure your communication with your ESL client is adequate, in addition to the usual court reporters and other support services you work with on cases, you may also need to use interpreting services in San Jose for help. Use these tips to help you build better communication with your ESL clients. esl - deposition

    Recognize the Degrees of Understanding

    For many people, talking to an attorney and listening to legalese even in their own language is challenging. For ESL clients, the language you use as an attorney can be very unclear. Your clients may technically understand your words, but they may not grasp the full meaning of what you are saying. Don’t take your client’s word that they understand what you’ve said without ensuring that he or she doesn’t just understand the words but the implications as well. Consider simplifying your language and using lay terms to get your points across.

    Provide Translations of Written Documents

    There are many tools available for translating written documents, so consider using some of them to translate documents for your clients. Provide a copy of the document in English and then provide a translation. Doing so will help you ensure that your clients truly understand what the document addresses.

    Hire an Interpreter

    Don’t take a chance with your clients’ understanding of important issues in their cases. When you’re reviewing cases with ESL clients or preparing them for trials or depositions, hire an interpreter to ensure your communication is easy and effective. You can also use an interpreter during deposition or to help during trial testimony. Using an interpreter will help your ESL clients avoid confusion, even when being questioned by other attorneys.

  • Presentation Tips for New Lawyers

    Presentations are part of life for lawyers, but they’re not quite like other things you do all day, like depositions or examining witnesses in court. The things you do to ensure you succeed in those tasks may not help you deliver a great presentation. Just as you need to prepare for depositions in San Jose differently than you do for trial work, you need to use the right technique to get ready for your presentation.

    Watch this video for tips for lawyers for making excellent presentations. One of the biggest mistakes lawyers make is going into presentations with a script. After all, law school stresses the importance of impeccable preparation, but with a presentation, scripting your remarks makes you sound stiff and nervous. Instead, use your personality during a presentation to engage with your audience and get the kind of interaction you want.

  • Top Reasons to Rely on Our Transcription Services

    When you need transcription services in San Jose , make Talty Court Reporters, Inc. the company you trust. Attorneys in the area have chosen us to handle everything from deposition services to court reporting since 1964.

    We understand that there is no compromising when it comes to accuracy in legal transcripts. That is why all our staff is trained in and compliant with guidelines from the State CSR Board. We are adept at working with multiple formatting options, including paperless transcripts, YesLaw, and E-Transcript. Our transcriptionists provide every client with a free, condensed version of their transcript for fast reference and a CD that also includes any exhibits that have been scanned. When your case is urgent, we can provide expedited services and rough drafts of the transcript as requested. Our years of experience and highly trained professionals mean that you can hire us with confidence instead of taking chances with an independent contractor.

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  • When to Call a Notary

    A court reporter is not the only outside help legal firms need. Notary services are also crucial for several different tasks. Often, your court reporter in San Jose can assist with notary services as well. Here are some of the reasons you may find that you need to hire a notary.

    Notaries can help to execute and finalize a number of legal documents and services. If your firm processes mortgages and other real estate transactions, you will need a notary to confirm the agreement. Notaries can also administer oral oaths and affirmations that aren’t strictly connected to legal documents, as well as act as a jurat to confirm that the contents of a legal document are true. You may also wish to use a notary to witness signatures on important legal documents ranging from deposition transcripts created by court reporters to legal agreements made during mediation. Hiring a notary from the same company you use for court reporters can make the process of formalizing documents and transcripts faster and more efficient.

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  • Understanding Hearsay Testimony

    During legal proceedings, hearsay testimony is generally prohibited. When hearsay is mentioned by a witness, the court reporter is usually instructed to strike it from the legal deposition. When you hire a court reporter in San Jose for a deposition, he or she won’t be able to advise you about hearsay testimony, but you can ask that the testimony be removed from the deposition transcript if both sides agree.

    Hearsay is repeating the statement of someone who is not in court or testifying during a deposition, or using a written statement of someone not involved in the hearings. The reason hearsay is usually prohibited is that there is no way to prove that the statement was made or to investigate the credibility of the person who allegedly made the statement. This prevents impeachment of that testimony, which can unfairly compromise one side’s case.

  • Video Deposition Prep Tips

    Video depositions held in San Jose are quickly becoming standard practice. By recording the deposition, you can use impactful visual evidence in court, rather than simply instructing a witness to read the court reporter’s transcript out loud. Arrange to meet the court reporter for the deposition in a conference room rental that already has the audiovisual equipment you’ll need. Then, allow plenty of time to prepare your witness for the camera. video - deposition

    Clothing

    Let your client know that although the legal deposition will take place outside of a courtroom, it’s still imperative to dress in a professional, formal manner—especially since the deposition is being recorded. If your client is male, instruct him to wear a conservative suit. Ladies may wear a skirt or pants suit. If they choose a dress, it should be a conservative style and color.

    Body Language

    Video depositions can be effective evidence, but unfortunately, this means they can also work against your case. Jurors watching a portion of the deposition can see if your client slouches, looks nervous, or appears combative. None of these problems will support your case. Remind your client to sit up straight, but to look relaxed and natural. He or she can avoid engaging in nervous habits like finger-tapping or hair-twirling by keeping the hands folded in front of him or her. Your client should look alert and attentive to convey the impression that he or she takes the case seriously.

    Tone of Voice

    When under stress, many people tend to talk unevenly or too rapidly, or to punctuate sentences with nervous laughter. Instruct your client to practice speaking in a measured tone of voice while you ask the types of questions he or she is likely to encounter.

    Answers

    While preparing for a deposition that will not be videotaped, lawyers often instruct their clients to pause when necessary to choose their words carefully. During a video deposition, unusually long pauses are not desirable because the jurors may interpret these unfavorably. Remind your client to answer the question honestly, but to avoid volunteering information. It’s acceptable to ask for clarification if the question is confusing.

  • The Federal Rules of Deposition Transcript Correction

    When a deposition transcript needs to be corrected, there are specific rules that must be followed. Failing to do so can jeopardize all of the testimony included in the deposition and may lead to a case being dismissed. Because deposition corrections can be time-consuming, it is important to hire court reporters in San Jose who are experienced to minimize the risk of errors. Here is what you need to know about the federal rules for making deposition corrections. transcript - corrections

    When can corrections be requested?

    After being notified by a court reporter that the transcripts are ready, deponents have 30 days to review them and ask for any necessary corrections. If the transcripts are delivered to the deponent’s attorney, the 30-day clock begins, even if the lawyer doesn’t immediately tell his or her client that the transcripts are available. Within that 30-day period, the deponent must submit the changes to the court reporter and certify those changes. Failing to do so will mean that the corrections cannot be made. Some attorneys may wish to ask deponents to review testimony before the deposition has ended. These reviews are on the record.

    How are changes made?

    Changes to deposition transcripts, whether in form or substance, are listed, with explanations for the changes, and then signed by the deponent before being submitted to the court reporter. Reasons for the changes must be given, or the transcripts may not be changed. The court reporter then attaches the changes to the transcript. Both the original testimony and the changes are kept as part of the record.

    Why is it important to review transcripts?

    Even if no changes are actually made to deposition transcripts, it is important to review them. Reviews must be requested formally before any corrections can be made. Although reviews are not required, they can be especially helpful for attorneys who plan to use the testimony to impeach the witness at trial. When a deponent has reviewed a deposition and certified it as correct, changing his or her answers in the courtroom is more problematic.

  • Using Deposition Transcripts to Impeach a Witness

    Depositions held in San Jose serve multiple purposes. Not only are legal depositions fact-finding endeavors, but they are also opportunities to discredit the other party’s witnesses later on in the legal process. For example, while your witness is testifying at the trial, you can ask him or her to read a relevant section of the deposition transcript provided by the court reporter. Assuming that the witness’s answer given during the deposition is different, you can then ask the court reporter for a read back of the answer given during the trial.

    For tips on how to approach a witness who has committed perjury, watch this in-depth video. This lawyer explains the importance of conducting cross-examination in such a way that allows the jury to fully understand what depositions are. Once they are aware that a deposition involves testimony given under oath, the jury can then understand the significance of the witness giving a contrary answer.

  • The Four Rules of Effective Witness Preparation

    Preparing your witness for a deposition is an essential part of a getting your case ready, but the process can seem overwhelming, especially if you have a nervous or reluctant witness. Fortunately, getting witnesses prepared to testify can be easily accomplished by following four simple rules. Make these rules as much a part of your preparation process as hiring a court reporter for deposition services in San Jose . witness - preparation

    Practice Listening Skills

    One of the errors witnesses are prone to making is giving an answer that does not relate back to the question. They may provide more information than the question asks for, or they may not answer the question at all, but instead give different information that can be used by the opposing counsel to uncover new details about the case. Practice getting your witness to listen to question carefully and giving a precise answer to exactly what is being asked.

    Practice Dealing with Misunderstandings

    Witnesses often feel pressured to answer questions even when they don’t understand them, which can lead to them providing misleading or false information that could damage their case. Help them get comfortable with saying that they don’t know the answer to a question rather than guessing or fabricating details. It can be especially difficult for expert witnesses to say they don’t know the answer something, so preparing them to do so can be particularly helpful.

    Practice Considering the Question

    Most witnesses want to jump right into an answer without thinking about the question and what they want to say. Help your witnesses get comfortable with the silence between the question and their answer that is necessary for them to give a thoughtful response. When witnesses try to fill in these silences, they may introduce new information or open doors to new avenues of testimony that could be detrimental to your case.

    Practice Giving Short Answers

    The best answers to questions in depositions are short ones. Short answers are easier for your court reporter and less open to scrutiny. Further, with a short answer, there is less of a chance of inadvertently sharing information that bolsters the other side’s case.