• Using Deposition Testimony in the Courtroom

    https://youtu.be/yoi8iwn8gva

    It’s possible for a witness’ answer to change between the time of the legal deposition and the trial. You can use the transcript made by the court reporter in San Jose during the deposition to impeach a witness during the trial. Watch this video to find out how one experienced trial lawyer uses cross-examination to build a case for perjury.

    He reminds viewers that most jurors don’t know what a deposition is or what the role of the court reporter is. This is why it’s essential to use cross-examination to educate the jury. You can accomplish this by asking the witness questions like, “Do you recall giving your legal deposition?” and “Do you recall giving an oath to tell the truth under penalty of perjury, just like you did before you took the witness stand today?” These types of questions emphasize to the jury the significance of the changes in the witness’ testimony.

  • Making the Right Objections During a Deposition

    Depositions are the backbone of discovery, and it’s crucial to know the difference between proper and improper objections. Whether you’ll be conducting your first or your hundredth legal deposition in San Jose, take a few minutes to brush up on the basics of deposition objections. If you object improperly or too frequently, it may damage your own credibility and, more importantly, derail your client’s train of thought. Here’s a quick look at some proper objections.

    Asked and Answered

    Don’t allow opposing counsel to ask the same question twice. Some lawyers may ask repetitive questions without realizing it. In other cases, it’s a blatant attempt to get the witness to change the answer. Object to repetitive questions before your client has a chance to answer it and potentially change a few words in the answer.

    Harassment

    Some lawyers persist in attempting to intimidate the deponent and opposing counsel by shouting, pointing fingers, and otherwise making a nuisance of themselves. If opposing counsel tries this with you or your deponent, stay calm and do not reciprocate. Instead, say to the court reporter, “Let the record reflect that Mr. Smith is yelling at my client.” For the record, you should clearly describe the type of harassing behavior, and that you will terminate the deposition unless it stops. Then, follow through if necessary.

    Legal Conclusions

    Legal depositions are conducted to get the facts of the case on the record. Counsel should not ask a deponent to give a legal conclusion, especially if the deponent isn’t a lawyer. You can object to questions that ask for non-factual information.

    Privilege

    Confidential, privileged relationships exist between patients and doctors, and clients and attorneys. Be wary of questions that ask the deponent to share information that was discussed in confidence. You can object to these questions based on the privileged relationship.

    Mischaracterization

    The mischaracterization of earlier testimony may be influential in a trial, and it confuses all involved parties as to the actual facts of the case. You can object based on opposing counsel’s mischaracterization of your client’s previous testimony.

  • Understanding Different Types of Notarial Acts

    Notary services are frequently necessary in legal proceedings, and other businesses often rely on notaries as well to certify their important documents. When should you consider using notary services in San Jose ? Here is a closer look at some common types of notarial acts.

    Jurat

    If you have a deposition transcript or affidavit that needs to be certified, then you may need a jurat. Jurats, also called verifications of oath, are legal affirmations that the information included in a document is true. A notary will require a signatory to agree to the information in the document before signing it, and the signature received during jurat notarial services signifies that the person signing the document swears that its content is true.

    Oral Oath or Affirmation Notary services

    Notaries are also able to administer an oral oath or affirmation. These do not need to be tied to a document for the notary to administer them. When under an oral oath or affirmation, the individual who was sworn in by the notary swears that any statements they provide will be completely truthful. The difference between an oath and affirmation is minor, and which one to use depends on the situation. An oath is a pledge of truthfulness to a supreme being, such as the oaths taken in a courtroom with a hand on the Bible. An oral affirmation is a pledge of truthfulness based on a person’s own honor and reputation.

    Copy Certification and Signature Witnessing

    Not all notarial acts involve administering oaths and affirmations. Notaries can also authenticate documents. With copy certification, a notary attests that a copy made of an original document reflects the original exactly and does not have any missing parts. Notaries can also confirm that a signature on a document is legitimate. For signature witnessing, the person who is signing the document must be present and must provide identification, so the notary can validate that the signature is legitimate.

  • See How Inconsistent Statements Can Be Used to Impeach Witnesses

    When your court reporter in San Jose creates a record of a legal deposition, he or she is providing you with a valuable tool you can use in the courtroom is impeach witness testimony. Accurate court reporting is the key to using this impeachment device.

    This video demonstrates how to use inconsistent statements to impeach a witness during trial testimony. If the transcript of your deposition created by your court reporter contains different answers than a witness provides on the stand in court, you can confront that witness about his or her changing testimony and challenge their truthfulness. Your legal deposition transcript is the proof you need to impeach a statement a witness gives at trial to call the entirety of his or her testimony into question.

  • The Important Role of Court Reporters in Case Preparation

    Court reporting in San Jose One of the most important tools you can use when you prepare a case is a court reporter . Court reporters can help through many stages of your cases, from witness preparation to depositions, and the transcripts they create are invaluable as you get ready to take a case to trial. Here is a look at some of the ways your court reporter in San Jose can help you get ready for court.

    Witness Preparation

    Before going into a deposition or a trial, you will certainly want to spend time preparing your witnesses for the questions that they might face. During this process, it is important that your witnesses stay consistent in their answers through all stages of the case. Using a court reporter to create a transcript of the questioning you do during your preparation can help you look for areas of weakness or inconsistencies, so you can focus on those before they arise during testimony. You can also use transcripts from your witness preparation sessions to plan your presentation and determine the order in which to call witnesses so that their statements build a clearer case.

    Depositions

    The deposition stage lets lawyers obtain information from witnesses by asking a variety of questions, including some which are not admissible in court. The information obtained during a deposition is invaluable, as it lets you prepare appropriately for cross-examinations, if the case does come to trial. Legal deposition transcripts can also help you impeach witness testimony if a witness changes his or her answers during trial. If you opt to make your own recording of a deposition rather than using a court reporter, you could be left without the tools you need to challenge witnesses if the case ends up in court.

    Technology

    Court reporters stay up-to-date on the latest technology being used in the legal field, including remote and video depositions, virtual case management, and online transcript viewers. They can give you access to tools that will make your case preparation easier and more convenient, giving you the flexibility to work from anywhere.

  • Making Legal Videography Work for Your Case

    Used in combination with other court reporting and transcription services, legal videography can boost your case through more efficient preparation and easier presentations to the judge and jury. To use legal videography, talk to your court reporter from Talty Court Reporters in San Jose to find out how our experienced team of production specialists can help you.

    There are multiple ways you can use legal videography in your case. You can use videos of depositions to help you review testimony and plan how you will present your case in court. You can use clips of witnesses giving testimony during depositions that they later contradict in court. You can also use video to break down complicated concepts so that they will be easier for the judge and jury to understand. Some attorneys use legal videography to streamline the discovery process. Our production specialists can prepare and sync videos for your use, so you can slot them directly into your case

    Legal videography

  • Why You Should Choose Talty Court Reporters for Notary Services

    If you need notary services near San Jose , then look no further than Talty Court Reporters, Inc. We offer notary services for any notarial need that your company or law firm may have, including copy certification, oath or affirmation, verification upon an oath or jurat, and signature witnessing. Some of the most common reasons why people turn to us for notary services include deeds of trust, wills, power of attorney, signature affidavit, and mortgage notes.

    At Talty Court Reporters, Inc., our mission is to make it as easy as possible for corporations and law firms to get their forms properly notarized. We are committed to providing our clients with exemplary customer service, as evidenced by the gleaming reputation that we have maintained for more than five decades. Talty Court Reporters, Inc. proudly serves San Jose and the surrounding areas. To find out more about the services we offer and why you should choose us for court transcript and notary services, please visit our website.

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  • Three Things You Can Do to Help Your Court Reporter

    Did you know that the process you use to book deposition services can potentially help your court reporter better prepare for your case? If you will be working with a court reporter in San Jose , then keep reading to learn what you can do to help her during the deposition booking process. court - reporter

    Start Communicating as Early as Possible

    The sooner that you schedule a deposition or hearing with the court reporting agency, the better. Your court reporter is part of your team and should be included in the process as soon as possible. Also, you can help your court reporter by keeping her informed of any cancellations or scheduling changes. Additionally, sending a copy of any subpoena or notice that you plan to use can save you time later by allowing your court reporter to prepare for the deposition in advance.

    Advise the Court Reporting Agency of Special Circumstances

    You can help your court reporter help you by informing the court reporting agency if you expect that court or a deposition will stretch through lunch or into the evening. By allowing your court reporter to make necessary arrangements for these circumstances, both of you can benefit.

    Also, if you suspect that you will require the services of an interpreter or videographer, then this should be shared with the court reporting agency in advance. When doing this, provide what details you can by explaining what type of witness you will be using and why an interpreter or videographer is needed.

    Specify Your Preferences and Needs Ahead of Time

    Is there a format you want the transcript to be in? If so, then it is ideal to inform your court reporting agency of this before the deposition. Similarly, if you will need the transcript to be expedited, then it is best to let the court reporting agency know at the time of the booking. Finally, if you will need the services of a videographer, make your appointment accordingly, as he will need to arrive before the deposition to set up the equipment.

  • How to Deal with Deposition Errors

    Mistakes in a deposition may mean the difference between winning and losing at trial. If you have run into errors with one of your depositions in San Jose , then read on for tips on how to deal with this problem. court - document

    Address Them in Time

    Deponents have 30 days to review the deposition transcript after being notified by the court reporter that it is available. Keep in mind that the deponent is not required to read over her testimony unless she or another party requests it.

    Request Review on Record

    During the deposition, ask the deponent to review the transcript once she is informed that it is available. If you choose to use deposition testimony against the witness, and she must admit that she reviewed the transcript and determined it to be correct, then making this request may benefit you at trial and give your argument more strength. Developing a standard time to request a review may make it easier for you to remember during each deposition.

    Understand the Review Process

    Within 30 days of being notified that the transcript is available, the witness should read and review the transcript, as well as create a list of any changes that she wishes to make. Also, she must sign a statement that explains the reasons for each of the changes. If the witness does not provide any reasons, then she will be bound to her original testimony. Also, the court will assess whether any changes requested serve a legitimate purpose. If the answers are changed, note that the court reporter will attach the signed list of changes to the transcript, and both the original and new answers will be included in the record that was generated during discovery.

    Consider Not Requesting Review

    On the other hand, if you noticed a mistake that the witness made and you would like to use this against her at trial, then you may not want to request that she review the transcript and submit a signed list of changes and reasons for them.

  • Get the Facts on Mobile and Cloud Discovery

    In the digital age, there is a growing number of locations where potentially responsive data can reside. If you need court reporting services near San Jose , then you may benefit from understanding the facts about how discovery relates to technology. Watch this video to learn about mobile and cloud discovery.

    Courts are insistent that wherever there is potentially responsive information, that the data there be addressed during discovery. This includes, for example, any data that is on social media, a laptop, or an iPad. The easiest way for a respondent to comply with a discovery request and find readily accessible mobile information that may be relevant is by accessing a network, servers, or cloud data. However, it’s expected that more and more attention will be focused on mobile device data in the future.